Monday, 25 November 2013

Philosophers' Madness: Thin line separates Genius and Insane

Her battle to survive schizophrenia: The top student who landed in a mental hospital  
 
a former Raffles Girls' Secondary School (RGS) student with a master's degree in philosophy from the London School of Economics. At the time of her arrest, she was a philosophy research scholar at the National University of Singapore (NUS).
The day after her arrest, she was admitted to the Institute of Mental Health where she was diagnosed with schizophrenia.
- See more at: http://yourhealth.asiaone.com/content/top-student-who-landed-mental-hospital/page/0/0#.dpuf


"In philosophy, philosophical problems are often taken to their logical extremes. In madness, real-life issues are taken to their logical consequences and acted upon. So is madness simply an extension of philosophical reasoning? And if so, could it be that philosophy and madness are somehow inextricably linked?" 


Miss Chan Lishan,  a former Raffles Girls' Secondary School (RGS) student with a master's degree in philosophy from the London School of Economics, was a philosophy research scholar at the National University of Singapore (NUS).


Read more at her blog: http://lishanchan.wordpress.com/2012/01/16/philosophy-of-madness/

Many famous and brilliant thinkers have been diagnosed with schizophrenia or a form of mental illness. Here's a list:

Vincent van Gogh = Artist
John Nash = Mathematician
Eduard Einstein = Son of Albert Einstein
Friedrich Nietzsche = Philosopher
Soren Kierkegaard = Philosopher
Michel Foucault = Philosopher
Ludwig van Beethoven = Composer and Musician
Leo Tolstoy = Novelist
Winston Churchill = Prime Minister of England during WW2

Eugene O'Neill = Nobel Prize-winning playwright
Ernest Hemingway =  Novelist winner of Pulitzer Prize and a Nobel Prize
Judy Collins = Singer and songwriter
Dorothy Hamill = 1976 Olympic figure skating champion





Those who ask the difficult questions, like “Why are we here?”, “From where do we derive morals?” and “What does it all really mean, when you get right down to it?” have given humanity amazing philosophical insights and ethical guidance. Unfortunately, thinking too much about these issues can sometimes also lead to the brains of those philosophizing rejecting the difficulty — feeling the pressure just a little too much! Then again, maybe it’s a wee bit of madness that leads great philosophers to try to seek out the answers in the first place.

Some people who are diagnosed with mental disorders, such as bipolar disorder, often have delusional thoughts or start to think too much about the meaning of life and why they personally are here on earth. It appears that people with diagnosed mental disorders often delve into the field of philosophy, which pulls together the fields of mental health and philosophy even more. (www.philo-sophia.net)


Read more at http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/mental-illness/

"In philosophy, philosophical problems are often taken to their logical extremes. In madness, real-life issues are taken to their logical consequences and acted upon. So is madness simply an extension of philosophical reasoning? And if so, could it be that philosophy and madness are somehow inextricably linked?" - See more at: http://yourhealth.asiaone.com/content/top-student-who-landed-mental-hospital/page/0/1#sthash.wtEqwA3J.dpuf